Volker Grüntges

Senior Partner, Munich, Germany

Volker Grüntges joined McKinsey in 1998 and is located in our Munich office. He is a member of the leadership group of the European Automotive marketing & sales practice, and focuses his work on regional strategies (esp. China, USA) and marketing & sales topics. These range from strategic topics (customer insights, brand strategy, product portfolio/positioning) to operational initiatives (retail excellence, dealer frontline improvement, supply chain) and organizational questions (best practice sales organizations).

Publications

Great FITS: Moving From Ideas to Savings

As cost-reduction challenges mount, automakers need a structured way to generate, evaluate, and determine the best ideas to reduce materials costs. McKinsey has developed a way to move "from ideas to savings" (FITS) during design-to-value initiatives quickly and concretely.

Platforming and Modularity: Smart Answers to Ever-Increasing Complexity

By adopting module and platform strategies, companies can head off complexity and deliver substantial product-based competitive advantages, but success requires them to attack this challenge systematically. By methodically understanding this unique opportunity to rethink their product portfolio, road map and processes, firms can better navigate the crucial path to market competitiveness.

Revolution by Design: Outsourcing Complete Vehicle Development

As OEMs worldwide seek greater flexibility in meeting customer needs in a wide variety of regional markets, outsourcing product development will become more common. However, automakers need to work carefully to make it a successful project and avoid last minute recovery missions.

Design-to-Value: Balancing Cost and Customer Value

Given today's breadth of product offerings and the emergence of a new breed of players with superior competencies in value-versus-cost optimization, companies need to step up their skills in product excellence. Learn how design-to-value approaches can help product organizations achieve this goal.

How Product Excellence Drives Company Success

Achieving product excellence forces leaders to push far beyond hardware to appeal to customer emotions and experience, providing a virtually unbeatable competitive advantage. But consistently achieving high performance in this area remains a constant challenge for even the most innovative companies. Drawing from experience with product innovators across a wide variety of industries, McKinsey & Company attempts to fill in the blanks regarding what makes one company's products consistently stand out from the rest of the pack.  

Key Insights into Differences Between the American and German Automotive Aftermarket

As the aftersales markets in Germany and the US evolve, a focused comparison of these fundamentally different environments can help players become more successful in shaping their strategies for the future. Learn more about four factors that point to continued success for independent players in both markets.

Projecting Demand for Electric Vehicles

The vexing question of just how big the electric vehicle (EV) market will become can be answered best by analyzing micromarkets. Learn more about the four steps companies can pursue in conducting an accurate EV analysis and how they can use this process to take charge of their EV forecasts.

Forecasting Agricultural Equipment Demand in Volatile Times

Shifting competitive realities and severe market disruptions make predicting agricultural equipment (AE) demand a challenge. McKinsey & Company's driver-based forecasting (DBF) approach offers a ready alternative for forecasting in unsteady times that can help AE (and other) companies adjust their strategies and planning processes in order to address the uncertainty ahead. 

Podcast: Developing a Low-Cost Vehicle Business Model

In today's uncertain economic environment, the rise of low-cost new cars seems right and an inevitable way to expand the market. However, playing in this arena requires rigid discipline and creative inspiration. Most importantly, it requires OEMs to deeply connect with markets in order to provide the tailored value shoppers seek.

Developing a Low-Cost Vehicle Business Model

In today's uncertain economic environment, the rise of low-cost new cars seems right and an inevitable way to expand the market. However, playing in this arena requires rigid discipline and creative inspiration. Most importantly, it requires OEMs to deeply connect with markets in order to provide the tailored value shoppers seek.

Key Takeaways for Automotive Aftersales Players

McKinsey & Company's CARE (Creating higher Aftersales Revenues & Earnings) initiative provides a comprehensive review of the forces shaping the automotive aftermarket. This final installment of a four-part series examines the key takeaways for three groups of industry players.

Vision 2015: Disruptive Strategies Could Shake Up the Aftersales Market

Part 3 of McKinsey & Company's four-part CARE (Creating higher Aftersales Revenues & Earnings) series on automotive aftersales looks ahead to the possible future competitive dynamics of this important sector of the automotive industry. Discover why potential market disruptions could make some aftersales players winners and others losers, as the market enters a new transformative phase.

The Aftermarket: Four Battlefields and Winning Strategic Options

In Part 2 of its four-part CARE (Creating higher Aftersales Revenues & Earnings) series, McKinsey & Company reveals that the most intense competition in the aftersales space occurs across four distinct "battlefields." While managers should be aware of all of these battles, they especially need to deeply understand the strategies and tactics employed in those battles relevant to their positions along the value chain. Learn why companies that win on their given battlefields have the best chances to realize high profit margins and to achieve sustainable growth in their aftersales business.

Why Automotive Aftersales Profits Are at Risk

Have automotive aftersales become an afterthought? In an industry focused on new products, the latest technologies, the freshest designs, the highest quality, and the best manufacturing productivity, "fixing cars" may seem staid, but it generates more than its share of value for an industry often desperate for profits. In the first installment of our four-part CARE (Creating higher Aftersales Revenues & Earnings) series, learn why OEMs currently find this high-margin business under attack.

Breakdown: Overhauling the Car Repair Industry

Automotive aftersales companies are no longer seeing the high profit margins they once were. Increasing deregulation, growing competition, and newcomers entering the market will force aftersales service providers to rethink their strategies. To shed light on success strategies and the future economics of the automotive parts and service aftermarket, McKinsey & Company's Automotive & Assembly Sector undertook a 12-month empirical research project, the "CARE" (Creating higher Aftersales Revenues and Earnings) Initiative. The results from the CARE Initiative provided the basis for a new report, published by McKinsey, which identifies ways industry players can improve the delivery of aftersales services and highlights new strategies for success.

CARE - Creating higher Aftersales Revenues and Earnings

The automotive spare parts and service business is set to face some big challenges in the next few years. Automakers' authorized service centers and second brands are involved in a struggle with service chains and independent providers for a share of the stagnating market. A new brochure, CARE (Creating higher Aftersales Revenues and Earnings) has been published by McKinsey & Company, which provides all stakeholders in the aftermarket business with an in-depth look at success strategies and the future economics of the automotive parts and service aftermarket. The brochure is based upon a 12-month empirical research project undertaken by McKinsey's Automotive & Assembly Sector.

Achieving Frontline Retail Excellence

Carmakers know that poor dealer performance can quickly kill a potential sale and under-managed dealer networks represent substantial, unexploited sales improvement opportunities. While OEMs clearly have not ignored retail performance, there remains plenty of room for improvement. McKinsey has developed an integrated approach that can rapidly build – or rebuild – a successful frontline network. The Frontline Sales Excellence approach focuses on the skills, tools, and techniques salespeople need to outperform the competition.