Florian Weig

Senior Partner, Munich, Germany

Florian Weig is a Senior Partner at the Munich office of McKinsey & Company. He is a member of the leadership on Advanced Industries, High Tech, and Operations practices. He leads the Product Development Practice in Europe.

Since joining McKinsey in November 1999, Florian has been involved in several large-scale operational transformations and turnarounds. His experience ranges from low-cost procurement to product complexity management. He has deep expertise in optimizing fast moving, high volume supply chains.

Florian’s passion and core expertise is, however, in product development: he built the Design-to-Value (DtV) service line offering product optimization to clients. He also was involved in several product development process transformations, reducing time to market substantially. Florian serves clients in automotive, electronics and semiconductor industries.

Publications

Next-Generation PLM: Rise of The Digital Twin

Automakers and their suppliers rely on product lifecycle management (PLM) techniques to turn ideas into customer products, but today’s exploding complexity requires better solutions. Four tailored PLM approaches can help.

Anticipating the Automotive Feature-Based Design Revolution

Unless they’re classics, cars usually don’t improve with age. But that could soon change if the industry adopts feature-based design approaches. Used extensively by software developers, feature-based techniques could boost customer satisfaction, make vehicle lifecycle management more flexible, and open new OEM revenue streams.

Unleashing a Lean Transformation in Engineering Departments

While engineering demands continue to mount, many engineers find themselves doing often-needless work that doesn’t add value. A modified version of the lean transformation that reliably wrings the waste out of plant floor operations can have the same impact in a company’s product development bull pens.

Running an Industry 4.0 Automotive Transformation

Manufacturers are buzzing about the Industry 4.0’s promise and the challenges it represents. As some of the hype begins to fade, leaders need to take a clear-eyed view of what this revolutionary transformation really means, and what their next steps are as they attempt to realize its potential.

How connected cars could transform automaking

The connectivity-focused automotive playing field described in part three of McKinsey's series on connected cars may seem fantastic to long-time industry players, but countless established firms in other industries have ignored their own digital destinies at their peril. Learn how OEMs and suppliers that take the lead in what could be a painful transformation can position themselves for success in the future.

Platforming and Modularity: Smart Answers to Ever-Increasing Complexity

By adopting module and platform strategies, companies can head off complexity and deliver substantial product-based competitive advantages, but success requires them to attack this challenge systematically. By methodically understanding this unique opportunity to rethink their product portfolio, road map and processes, firms can better navigate the crucial path to market competitiveness.

Moore's Law: Repeal or Renewal?

Moore's Law has guided the global semiconductor industry for nearly five decades, but pressing economic challenges could derail its impact for at least part of the industry in the short- to mid-term future. Learn why industry players need to think through the issues they currently face, position themselves to compete in specific segments, and align their strategic plans to make it all work.

The Need for (Premium) Speed: Driving Value through Agility

The ability to move nimbly in times of crisis has always separated the winners from the laggards - a lesson that increasing numbers of premium automotive players have embraced. Where in the past such agility may have meant the difference between success and failure, today it can help premium-segment car companies deal with increasing demand volatility.

Design-to-Value: Balancing Cost and Customer Value

Given today's breadth of product offerings and the emergence of a new breed of players with superior competencies in value-versus-cost optimization, companies need to step up their skills in product excellence. Learn how design-to-value approaches can help product organizations achieve this goal.

Mobility of the Future

A McKinsey team has taken a look back and analyzed the complete mobility market over the past 40 years. In addition, the team has conducted an extensive consumer survey in the German market. The resulting focus topics center around business segments in which OEMs can grow beyond their traditional business model and the exciting future opportunities OEMs have in the fields of media integration and car sharing.

Mobility of the Future

Did you miss our live webcast on the implications of future mobility choices for automotive OEMs? Here’s your chance to catch up. Access an on-demand version of our "Mobility of the Future – Opportunities for Automotive OEMs" webcast, which provides an in-depth analysis of the complete mobility market over the past 40 years. Learn which business segments could help OEMs grow beyond their traditional business models, and explore exciting future opportunities in the fields of media integration and car sharing.

How Product Excellence Drives Company Success

Achieving product excellence forces leaders to push far beyond hardware to appeal to customer emotions and experience, providing a virtually unbeatable competitive advantage. But consistently achieving high performance in this area remains a constant challenge for even the most innovative companies. Drawing from experience with product innovators across a wide variety of industries, McKinsey & Company attempts to fill in the blanks regarding what makes one company's products consistently stand out from the rest of the pack.  

Chain lightning: Creating Automotive Logistics Excellence

Poor shipping performance costs automakers more than they might expect, in part because many already assume they enjoy state-of-the-art performance in this critical area. Instead, a cross-industry review shows many auto players are falling behind other industries that have evolved new thinking and techniques. To catch up, car companies need to adapt and adopt benchmark approaches from other industries to achieving logistical excellence.

Fast Times: Bringing Engineers up to Speed

Getting to market first remains a primary predictor of competitive success.  And despite the often heroic efforts of manufacturers to cut the time required to move from concept to mass production, time continues to weigh heavily on the shoulders of product teams. While most managers believe they have already plucked all of the low-hanging fruit to be found in their product development operations, many can still cut significant amounts of time from their R&D processes by shortening the length of individual learning cycles.

Chain lightning: Creating Automotive Logistics Excellence

Poor shipping performance costs automakers more than they might expect, in part because many already assume they enjoy state-of-the-art performance in this critical area. Instead, a cross-industry review shows many auto players are falling behind other industries that have evolved new thinking and techniques. To catch up, car companies need to adapt and adopt benchmark approaches from other industries to achieving logistical excellence.

Development Target Costing: A Mission to Mars?

While few companies will ever participate in completing a trip to Mars, such a project illustrates how McKinsey & Company's target costing model could make a voyage to the red planet a lot cheaper.

Blind Benchmarking: Cracking Competitor R&D Costs

Like gamblers with winning hands, most OEMs hold data regarding their R&D portfolios "close to their vests" to prevent competitors from understanding their organization's true performance in this critical area. McKinsey & Company's top-down, outside-in benchmarking approach can help automakers put their competitors' cards on the table in a sense, providing critical insights into the product development challenges they face. 

Mastering complexity as a competitive weapon

The world of product development is becoming more intricate by the day. Driven by pressures from the market, companies struggle to cope with their ever growing and changing product portfolios. By implementing well-designed comprehensive programs, however, companies can use complexity optimization as a strategic competitive weapon.